Eco Gardening with Plants that Attract Honey Bees

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Did you know that the honey bee population has suffered a terrible decline over the past several years? The reason for this is because they have lost much of the floral habitat they depend on. Chemical pesticides have also played a role in the decline of bees. If the honey bee disappeared, we would lose much of our world food supply. Without bees, our gardens and farms would suffer and die off because there would be no pollination to further production.

Bees are a are vital to a healthy ecosystem and play an important role in pollinating many plants. Glistening golden honey bees are a welcome sight to nature conscious gardeners. Being nature’s most proficient pollinators, they help increase yields in ones garden. These wonderful little busy workers are extremely beneficial to your fruit, flower and vegetable production.

What Plants Attract Honey Bees?

Native Plants


First and foremost , bees absolutely adore plants that are native to your region. Please do try to incorporate these types of perennials into your gardens and landscaping. Your little buzzy friends will love you for it! Most native plants are relatively easy to grow, as they are already acclimated to their surroundings. You may already have some of these growing in your yard. Yarrow is a prime example of this, as it’s typically found in most lawns. If you uproot the yarrow and gather all of the roots and leaves in a big handful, they can be easily planted in an ornamental area of your landscape. I live on a pretty large piece of land, and purposely let some of it grow tall so the bees can feed off of the nectar from

Bright Flowers, Culinary Herbs & Vegetables


Honey bees are naturally attracted to certain kinds of plants because of their colors and scent. Adding a variety of colorful perennials to your garden will attract beneficial insects and unique bird species like hummingbirds.

Tips from Jennifer Davit of Chicago’s Lurie Garden:


Plant at least five plants of one variety to attract bees and supply pollen and nectar. If you have only a small space, talk to your neighbors or transform your parkway.

Plant a succession of plants that will flower throughout the seasons — from spring to fall — so honeybees have pollen and nectar over a long period of time.

Add blue and purple flowers, which are particularly attractive to honeybees.

Choose native plants that are preferred by honeybees, because genetically altered cultivars don’t produce as much pollen and nectar.

Don’t use pesticides. Honeybees are extremely sensitive to any pesticides, so garden in a natural way and refrain from using harsh chemicals. (source link)

 

List of Plants that Attract Honey Bees:


Basil 

Bee Balm

Black Eyed Susan

Borage

Broccoli Flowers

Buckwheat

Buttefly Weed

Calamint

Catmint

Chamiso

Cotoneaster

Caltrop Kallstroemia

Cilantro – Corriander

Currant

Dill

Elder

Goldenrod

Globe Thistle

Hyssop

Huckleberry

Ice Plant

Joe-Pye Weed

Lavendar 

Lupine

Lovage

Marigold

Marjoram

Milkweed

Mullein

Oregon Grape

Oregano

Penstemon

Purple Coneflower

Rosemary

Rose of Sharon

Salvia

Sedum

Summer Squash, Ornamental Gourds & Pumpkin Blossoms

Sunflower

St. John’s Wort

Soapwort

Star Thistle

Wallflower

Zinnia

We recommend using the highest quality Raw Honey from our favorite apiary, Sleeping Bear Farms.


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3 comments

  1. [...] original post here: Plants that Attract Bees to Your Garden | Real Raw Honey ← Rain Bird ESP-4TM 4 Station Indoor Controllers: Efficient and Easy to Use New Gardeners [...]

  2. Carolyn Golfer says:

    Terrific source…

  3. Bianca says:

    Just a warning for those who have horses, star thistle is delicious delicious poison, also it can be invasive best if left in the pot.

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